Treat Madhya Pradesh farmers’ protest with urgency; a contagion could deepen the crisis

Treat Madhya Pradesh farmers' protest with urgency; a contagion could deepen the crisis
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The current food crisis is the result of our inability to solve the problems related to agriculture that occur every time the monsoon fails – where we choose to forget gravity once a correction occurs in the weather conditions. With almost 60 to 70 percent of kharif production dependent on rainfall, it is not surprising that farmers face challenges when the monsoon is below normal.

The problems of agriculture are numerous and begin from the time of planting to delivery to the market. These include the availability of high-quality seeds, inputs such as water and fertilizer, pre-harvest and post-harvest finance levels, freight logistics, and finally the marketing where they are sold to consumers. The fact that agriculture is disorganized means that there are several levels of intermediaries that can range to 6-8 depending on crop and location. Gaps in all parts of the value chain tend to be exacerbated when farmers’ incomes are affected without declining. This is well known, but it hit the headlines when there are debates about exceptions to the loan.

The development of Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh highlight these problems. Loan waivers are the latest controversy on the farm, especially during the upcoming elections where it was a major win point. This was followed in Maharashtra and will continue to expand to other states as well. The problem is double disclaimers. The first is that if it is not invoked, the whole community suffers, creating social problems, including farmers’ suicides. Moreover, eliminating loans, creating a moral hazard in those dealing with your debt are penalized and encouraged not to repay the loans in the future. Banks have always been against such schemes, for this reason, because the probability of non-performing assets (NPA) increase as farmers choose to faint payments. At present, with a high level of NPA, banks are not able to forgive such loans, but the question raised is whether corporate borrowing can be adjusted, why non-farm loans in which the reasons are more convincing . The route should be the government such provisions should be made in the budget. This becomes an enigma for states because agriculture is a state issue and it is unlikely that the central finance the cost of the Union budget. States have a problem in their hands because of the fiscal responsibility and budget management rules in 2003 (FRBMA) that limit the level of deficit or tax debt they can undertake. The ratio is set at 3 percent of gross domestic product (GSDP) and, therefore, if states are working close to this number, they will not extend this benefit. This is the puzzle that explains part of the controversy that arose in Maharashtra, where farmers require such exceptions. The other problem that is very relevant again in relation to farmers’ incomes. It was noted that agricultural prices tend to be unstable when increased and decreased depending on supplies. While higher prices are useful when accident prices cause distress when income decreases.

Why Old-Timey Jobs Are Hot Again

Why Old-Timey Jobs Are Hot Again
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Walk in parts of Brooklyn, Portland and Pittsburgh, and find elegant cocktails, barbers and occasional butchers, with young college graduates. To facilitate the segment of today’s urban economy, jobs were once again reckoned the state of semi-annual joblessness in occupations of glamor, says sociologist Richard Ocejo.

In his new book, “Masters of Art: Old Jobs in the New Urban Economy,” M. Ocejo examines the forces driving the revival of professions as a butcher and waiter among the young urban middle class. A similar dynamic works with a handful of other jobs, including craft beer, the bookbinder, furniture maker and fishmonger.

The Department of Labor states that between 2014 and 2024, the number of waiters and hairdressers in the United States will increase by 10 percent. 100, while butchers will see an increase of 5 percent. 100, compared to a 7% job growth for professions in the same period. The average salary for these jobs was less than $ 30,000 per year in 2016.

Millennia are drawn to these professions, in part as a reaction to “the ephemeral of the digital age,” says Ocejo, a professor of sociology at John Jay University of Criminal Justice and the City University of New York Graduate Center.

Like many of today’s most publicized jobs in areas such as information technology and financial services, these trades “are based on the use of hands, with real tools and materials, to provide a specific product Tangible, “he said.

To attract young people with college degrees and other options in the job market, jobs usually have an element of performance, according to M. Ocejo. In most of the Masters of Craft races, workers interact closely with clients, often in a public context, where their skills and knowledge can be admired. Therefore, it is unlikely that certain manual positions like the electrician and the plumber, experiencing the same “revaluation,” he said.

Unlike real estate gentrification, where the arrival of wealthier people moves low-income residents into a neighborhood urbanites do not usually move workers into more established companies in the same industry, said M. Ocejo.
Whole animal fashion of a butcher does not grow the local boucherier said, as it is likely “closed long ago, when the Italians moved.” And it does not harm halal butchers in any neighborhood. These shops serve a different clientele.

“They have created a niche that did not exist before, and operate in parallel but very, very separate ways” with preexisting companies, said M. Ocejo.

But aesthetics play a key role in the ideal of craftsmanship: waiters with leagues and handlebar mustaches tattooed butchers carving an unusual cut of meat-Mr. Ocejo said that jobs tend to attract people from similar cultural backgrounds, creating a barrier to others.

“It’s very difficult, if you come from a working class or a minority to get one of these jobs, which would give you higher salaries, opportunities for contacts and a more interesting job,” he said. “It’s a challenge for these companies to be more inclusive and not just hire people like themselves or part of their social network.”